edwardspoonhands
edwardspoonhands:

pleatedjeans:

via

Yuuuup.
I love it how fifty year olds are like “BOTTLED WATER IS SO EVIL! It’s SUCH A WASTE OF PLASTIC!” However, if you place mountains of sugar that was acquired through industrial farming and some psychotropic compounds into the water and make it into liquid candy they’re like “THIS IS AN EXCELLENT USE OF PLASTIC AND YOU SHOULD POUR THIS STUFF INTO YOURSELF AND YOUR CHILDREN!”
There is definitely a fourth category here though…people realizing that things that their parents think are great and acceptable are in fact terrible (examples…coal…and homophobia.)

edwardspoonhands:

pleatedjeans:

via

Yuuuup.

I love it how fifty year olds are like “BOTTLED WATER IS SO EVIL! It’s SUCH A WASTE OF PLASTIC!” However, if you place mountains of sugar that was acquired through industrial farming and some psychotropic compounds into the water and make it into liquid candy they’re like “THIS IS AN EXCELLENT USE OF PLASTIC AND YOU SHOULD POUR THIS STUFF INTO YOURSELF AND YOUR CHILDREN!”

There is definitely a fourth category here though…people realizing that things that their parents think are great and acceptable are in fact terrible (examples…coal…and homophobia.)

npr
pbsthisdayinhistory:

July 16, 1951: The Catcher in the Rye is Published
On this day in 1951, J.D. Salinger’s novel, The Catcher in the Rye, was published. The novel tells the story of 16-year-old Holden Caulfield, a troubled character who challenged 1950s conformity, much like Salinger himself.
Due to its somewhat rebellious tone, Salinger’s work has been linked to issues of controversy and censorship.  Even so, over 60 years later, The Catcher in the Rye has sold over 65 million copies and continues to sell an additional 500,000 each year.
Learn about the novel’s path to publication with American Masters’ J. D. Salinger infographic.
Photo:  A 1951 copy of J.D. Salinger’s The Catcher in the Rye (Rare Book and Special Collections Division, Library of Congress). 

pbsthisdayinhistory:

July 16, 1951: The Catcher in the Rye is Published

On this day in 1951, J.D. Salinger’s novel, The Catcher in the Rye, was published. The novel tells the story of 16-year-old Holden Caulfield, a troubled character who challenged 1950s conformity, much like Salinger himself.

Due to its somewhat rebellious tone, Salinger’s work has been linked to issues of controversy and censorship.  Even so, over 60 years later, The Catcher in the Rye has sold over 65 million copies and continues to sell an additional 500,000 each year.

Learn about the novel’s path to publication with American Masters’ J. D. Salinger infographic.

Photo:  A 1951 copy of J.D. Salinger’s The Catcher in the Rye (Rare Book and Special Collections Division, Library of Congress). 

foxsoccer

World Cup Diary: Brazil reinventing, redefining itself one step at a time

foxsoccer:

SALVADOR, Brazil —

Brazil wasn’t what I had expected. I’ve been here three weeks now, covering the United States men’s national team across this vast and diverse country, and I’m still not quite sure what to make of it.

The image was strikingly similar to that of the country where I covered the last World Cup, South Africa: A shambolic government that couldn’t get anything done by a deadline, inflicting crippling poverty lived in rambling shantytowns, in a country ruled only by lawlessness. But as it was in South Africa, most construction in Brazil has been completed, or at least looked the part, and I’ve never once felt unsafe.

Sao Paulo, where the United States and its press corps have been based, is a confusing place. There is no containing its sprawl, all of it infested with boxy apartment towers — invariably with terraces adorned with flapping Brazilian flags — pricking the blue sky. The traffic is soul-crushing. On a bad day, you can average less than five miles an hour in your cab or bus. Some days, early in our stay, the subway workers were on strike and it was worse still and you just stood there, thousands of running cars frozen in place.

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foxsoccer

World Cup Day 13: The Good, The Bad, and The (very) Ugly

foxsoccer:

image

Hungry for another World Cup recap? Chew on this:

Suarez’s third career bite for club and country was obviously THE viral story of the day, so we’re going to start with “the ugly” and save the best good for last. Bon appetit! 

THE UGLY

image

Suarez is making a habit of snacking on his opponents (is human flesh really that tasty? Is the joke on us?). The Liverpool star was suspended ten Premier League games for biting Chelsea’s Branislav Ivanovic last season, and 7 games by the Dutch league for munching on PSV’s Ottman Bakkal in 2010 while at Ajax. 

On Tuesday, Italy defender Giorgio Chiellini became Vampire Suarez’s latest victim. Note the bite mark on Chiellini’s shoulder in the picture above. The referee did not see it, so no foul was called, but the rest of the world’s population did and responded accordingly:

When the incident first happened, we weren’t exactly sure if Suarez seriously did it again. Good thing we have video replay now:

Yup. He really did it. For a THIRD time. Which begs the following, excellent questions:

If only these vendors had told Suarez this before the game:

In Suarez’s defense…

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